Things to Think About Before Giving Thanks

dog turkey

Thanksgiving is next week! Eeek! Where has this year gone?! Thanksgiving is one of our favorite holidays and I don’t think we’re alone on that sentiment. Feasting, family, friends and fun — what’s not to love about it?!

As you are preparing to gather and give thanks, keep your pets in mind, as well. During this time of year, it’s so easy to get caught up in the hustle and bustle of the holidays, but taking a few moments, now, to ensure your pets’ safety and well-being during Thanksgiving, will allow both you and your pets to enjoy the holiday to the fullest.

Here are some pointers to keep in mind:

ID: Be sure your pet is wearing proper identification, whether your pet is traveling with you over the holiday, or if he/she is staying home. With all the comings and goings during this time of year, it’s easy for Fido or Fluffy to slip out the door and even if they’re microchipped, an ID tag will up the chances of a timely reunion if they were to go missing.

Travel: If you’ll be bringing your pets along to friends’ or relatives’ homes for Thanksgiving, make sure your pet is traveling safely. If you’ll be driving, keep your pet confined to a travel crate or use a seatbelt-type restraint. It’s safer for both you and them. If flying or taking a train, be sure to follow all guidelines set forth by the airline or rail line and take a look at this post from the Humane Society of the United States for important information about the risks associated with pet travel.

Table scraps: Of course, most of us want to include our pets in our Thanksgiving feasting, but it’s not the best idea. Certain foods can cause a very painful and potentially serious condition called pancreatitis and some foods are downright toxic to pets. Small amounts of foods like plain veggies or rice are okay to feed as a special holiday snack, but be sure not to overdo it! No one wants upset tummies on Thanksgiving night! Below are two handy charts which give ideas about what foods are and are not okay for your pets to snack on:

Thanksgiving-Foods-That-Are-Dangerous-to-Dogs-and-Cats-Learn-More-at-IrresistiblePets.com_1    

Thanksgiving-Food-Dogs-and-Cats-Can-Eat-Learn-More-at-Irresistiblepets.com_

Garbage: Just because you don’t feed it to your pet doesn’t mean he or she won’t try to get it themselves. A trashcan full of bits of Thanksgiving goodness can be irresistible to a dog or cat. Aside from food scraps they shouldn’t be eating, garbage such as tin foil, strings, and packaging can pose dangers to pets who may raid the trashcan in search of a snack. Be sure to keep trashcans and full trash bags secured away from where pets can reach them.

Plants and decorations: Traditionally, the day after Thanksgiving marks the beginning of the Christmas season. If you’ll be decorating next weekend, keep in mind that certain plants, including pointsettia, holly and mistletoe can be harmful to your pets. Opt for pet-safe plants, or artificial ones, instead. Also, if your holiday table or decorating will include candles, be sure to keep them clear of curious pets’ reach.

If your pets won’t be taking part in Thanksgiving festivities this year, make sure to enlist the help of a trusted friend or relative to check in on them while you’re gone. Better yet, hire a professional! Our spots are filling up fast, so if you’ll need pet care services from us over the holiday, contact us as soon as possible to see if we can accommodate you.

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone!!

About Jena Mazzio

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